B7H3 Is An Up-and-coming Immunotherapy Target

B7H3 is a protein that is overexpressed in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer and is believed to play a role in regulating the immune system and developing tumors. Therefore, targeting B7H3 with immunotherapy drugs may be a promising approach for the treatment of prostate cancer.
This is an area of great interest for me. In many of the NanoString analyses we performed on patients during immunotherapy treatment, the upregulation of B7H3 was a significant resistance mechanism. We certainly have seen success in working with this checkpoint inhibitor in many cancer types. It may be proven as or more important than current FDA-approved immunotherapy. The combination of all these, injected into the cancer, is where the real success is found.

Several studies have investigated the use of B7H3-targeted immunotherapy drugs in prostate cancer. For example, a phase 1 clinical trial tested an anti-B7H3 antibody called 8H9 in patients with advanced prostate cancer and found that the drug was well-tolerated and showed some evidence of clinical activity.

Another clinical trial tested an anti-B7H3 antibody called enoblituzumab in patients with localized prostate cancer who were not eligible for surgery or radiation therapy. The trial found that enoblituzumab was well-tolerated by patients and showed promising efficacy in shrinking tumors and delaying disease progression.

In addition to antibodies, other types of immunotherapy drugs targeting B7H3 are also being investigated for the treatment of prostate cancer. For example, a phase 1 clinical trial tested a B7H3-targeted CAR T cell therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The treatment was safe and showed some evidence of clinical activity.

While the results of these studies are promising, more research is needed to fully understand the potential of B7H3 as a target for prostate cancer immunotherapy and to determine the optimal use of B7H3-targeted drugs in combination with other therapies.

Reference: Prasad, S. (9 de June de 2014). Does black pepper enhance the curcumin effect? Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 140-146. doi:10.4103/2225-4110.130992

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